European American Music Distributors Company is a member of the Schott Music Group

Information Regarding COVID-19:
Our New York City office remains closed to protect the health and safety of all of our employees. During this time, we are doing everything possible to minimize disruptions to our daily operations. All employees are working remotely from home and remain fully contactable. If you have had to cancel or postpone a performance of a work from our catalogue, or are considering live streaming performances or streaming archival material, we are prepared to assist you in facilitating changes. Please direct all questions or concerns to rental@eamdc.com.

Please note:

  • All materials from canceled or completed performances should be returned to our Verona, New Jersey library only.
  • Please do not return materials to our New York office. Unfortunately, we cannot be responsible for lost materials that are returned to our New York office while it is closed. If materials are lost, we will have to charge the full replacement value.

In observance of Blackout Tuesday, we will not be conducting regular business on June 2. We stand in solidarity with the Black American community and our colleagues across the music industry and will add our efforts to bring justice and peace in our country. 

Katherine Balch Joins PSNY
2018 announcement (blog size)
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Posts tagged 'WNYC Radio'

Two-Piano Works from Tobias Picker & Timo Andres

Spring is in full swing, and for the past four years that means that the Ecstatic Music Festival is well underway in New York. This year, Timo Andres presents a new song cycle, "Work Songs", to be performed by Gabriel Kahane, Ted Hearne, Becca Stevens, Nathan Koci, & Andres himself. Be sure to check out the concert on March 19th, co-presented by WNYC's New Sounds!

If that doesn't satisfy your Timo fix, we have two more of his works now available from PSNY: his re-composition of Mozart's "Coronation Concerto", which he brilliantly premiered with the Metropolis Ensemble, and his concert-length, two-piano work, Shy and Mighty, which he released as an album on Nonesuch Records. 

Another two-piano work that pianists should not miss is Tobias Picker's Keys to the City, commissioned by the City of New York in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge. Originally a piano concerto, Picker premiered the two-piano version in 1996. This work has been recorded on Chandos and Wergo. Check out an excerpt of the two-piano version here, performed by Picker and Ursula Oppens: 

Theory in Practice

Well, it looks like the legitimacy of digital sheet music has finally been made official: Daniel Wakin's article in the New York Times has brought the practice of reading music from a screen, rather than paper, to readers across the world. It's something we've been pushing for from the start, and something that many of our composers and performers of their work have been doing for a good while now. 

When we launched, Nicholas Kitchen of the Borromeo String Quartet was nice enough to give us some excellent praise: "[PSNY] expands and builds upon the already-productive synergy among players, composers, and publishers, strengthening the necessary structure for musical partnerships.  Expanding the medium to the readable and changeable form of computer files will amplify the collaboration, and open countless doors for all of us."

And if you haven't seen how the Borromeo Quartet uses technology, here's a clip from a live broadcast on WNYC (consider this our plug for Beethoven Awareness Month!:

Chamber music is a natural fit for digital editions: a solo performer can easily read music from an iPad or any other tablet or laptop. Our composer Timo Andres has been an early advocate of the practice - he can often be seen performing with an iPad perched on the piano, turning pages with a nifty pedal. Here he is performing "At The River" at the Bang on a Can Festival in 2011:

(Photo by Jon Hurd on flickr)

And of course, several of our composers have been incorporating technology and non-paper notation for years: Morton Subotnick and Alvin Singleton, for example. 

Reading music from a screen, like reading a book from a screen, might not be for everyone, and of course we offer print-on-demand editions of all of our works. But for the adventurous, digital music is becoming an increasingly appealing solution.

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